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Major Public Safety Power Shutoffs (PSPS) in Northern California

utilitydive.com

This is not my normal post for Tuesday. The normal post will be posted as a resource later today.

Yesterday I received a robo-call and email from PG&E indicating that my residence in Arnold, CA (Sierra Nevada Mountains) may experience a PSPS tomorrow, and it may last for several days. I also saw on the local news that PSPSs are expected in many of the hills around the Bay Area of and other parts of Northern California. Based on the numbers that the media was reporting I would guess that there may be 100,000 without power by this time tomorrow morning. For more information on these events go through the link below.

Tonight the last element of a very strong dry high wind event will slide into place. These are described in the beginning of section 3 in the paper linked below. Per the National Weather Service site yesterday, this will end for Arnold on Thursday Morning, but the PSPS (if there is one) may take another day or two to end.

 

John Benson's picture

Thank John for the Post!

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Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Oct 8, 2019 6:02 pm GMT

Overwhelmed or Ill Informed, 70,000 Wildfire Victims May Get Nothing

PG&E, the company claims, is broke. Can't pay its bills. Though the sale of Diablo Canyon Power Plant would make $5 billion available to wildfire victims and transmission line maintenance, the company's plans to close it and plow it into the ground haven't changed. The reason has nothing to do with the "changing energy landscape", "economics", or a lack of consumer demand. It has to do with replacing it with gas and making a killing on the sale of fuel.

What about the "clean energy transition", which will supposedly replace nuclear and gas with renewables? As it turns out, adding renewables to the mix results in more gas consumption than generating all of California's electricity with gas alone. Variable wind and solar require gas to balance supply, and with turbine starts costing $5,000 each, it's cheaper to keep them running all the time in "spinning reserve". That burns a lot of extra fuel - the cost of which is billed to ratepayers.

With our state's twisted dynamic encouraging fossil fuel consumption, fuel-efficient nuclear is not un-economic, but too economic. A proposed bill would force the sale of Diablo Canyon next year, to which formidable opposition from PG&E, Big Gas, and Big Renewables is already mounting. But ratepayers, environmentalists, wildfire victims, and frustrated homeowners without power have had enough.

John, best of luck getting your power back ASAP.
 

Walid Matar's picture
Walid Matar on Oct 11, 2019 11:19 am GMT

More blackouts can be expected in the future.

https://www.theverge.com/2019/10/10/20908434/california-blackouts-utilities-fires-lawsuits-san-francisco-bay-area-pge-pacific-gas-electric

Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Oct 11, 2019 11:40 am GMT

What do you think it'll realistically take in the region for this to get fixed as quickly as possible?

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