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Podcast / Audio

One from the 'chinwag' vaults - the differing fortunes of offshore wind and nuclear power in the UK

CR_JM

If you want supreme technical quality and seamless production click away now.  (things do, hopefully, improve in later podcasts). If you want well-informed energy related analysis then continue.

I dug this from the vaults, it is the first podcast from Charley Rattan and John Massey, who together are "Astute New Energy". 

In this episode we have a general chat about the differing fortunes of offshore wind and nuclear power here in the UK. Both provide important sources of low carbon power from huge power generation projects. Yet one is booming and seeing its costs plummet, while the other is beset by delays, high costs and investor disinterest. Why the difference? It's not a story simply of technology and money, but one where supply chain, policy and industrial strategy issues will all play major roles.

So, despite some first-effort 'quirks' (barking dog anyone...) click and enjoy and feel free to get in touch with any comments or suggestions for our future discussions. 

 

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Charley Rattan's picture

Thank Charley for the Post!

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Discussions

Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Dec 10, 2019 1:41 pm GMT

the differing fortunes of offshore wind and nuclear power here in the UK. Both provide important sources of low carbon power from huge power generation projects. Yet one is booming and seeing its costs plummet, while the other is beset by delays, high costs and investor disinterest. Why the difference? It's not a story simply of technology and money, but one where supply chain, policy and industrial strategy issues will all play major roles.

Despite their differences, I think these two power sources can be used in conjunction in a very useful way. People tend to get very aggressive/defensive about their preferred power sources, but each of these offer something that the other doesn't and ideally-- since we're not going to find a magic silver bullet-- each will find a way to contribute towards the clean energy future we all agree is needed. 

Charley Rattan's picture
Charley Rattan on Dec 10, 2019 2:41 pm GMT

It's strange how things turn out Matt.  15 yers ago when I moved into renewables people talked of 20% renewables and 80% nuclear to get to low carbon.  I suspect those proportions are probably now reversed.

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