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Enveloping Evolution-Making Windows Perform Like Walls

As evidenced in ASHRAE Standard 55-2017 and the update to Standard 55 of July 2018, solar radiation is a major source of indoor thermal comfort issues and it must be removed by energy intensive air conditioning. When you couple this with the massive growth in energy demand as detailed in The Future of Cooling you can see major concerns for compounded carbon emissions as well as staff and customer comfort and productivity issue. These concern show the need for a much better solution to glazing inefficiency. That solution is window insulators!

Solar radiation, radiant heat radiation, and infiltration need to be dealt with at the source. Window insulators do this best and unlike replacement windows and window treatments make the window perform more like a wall! 

INTERNAL SHADING AND BLINDS

Once solar gains have passed through a window and hit an internal blind, they are already inside the space. Only if the blind surface is highly reflective and the solar rays redirected straight back out the window will this not result in some heat build-up. Thus, whilst the blinds may effectively block glare and daylight, conduction, convection and radiation will usually convey a large portion of the heat to the internal space.

From:  THE THERMAL EFFECTS OF SOLAR GAIN

By Dr. Andrew J. Marsh

A window insulators with substantial emissivity, reflectivity, a seal, and Uv coating can immediately eliminate 75% of the radiant heat, 65% of the solar heat, and over 90% of the Uv from entering the building or home while substantially reducing infiltration! That insulated window performs like a wall!

This is a an unprecedented building envelope improvement but the benefits do not stop there! A very important factor in building efficiency and comfort is thermal performance. The three primary sources for human thermal discomfort according to the Window Performance for Human Thermal Comfort are solar radiation, long wave radiation, and the convection loop. In'Flector Radiant Barrier Window Insulator puts a radiant barrier between the inefficient glazing and the controlled indoor environment! The insulated window will provide an additional benefit because the air conditioned or heated air does not make contact with the convective conductive glazing. With the In'Flector Insulating panel you can reduce infiltration by over 64%! The insulated window treatment is the only window efficiency product that deals with every inefficiency of glazing! Because buildings and homes are the largest source of carbon emissions (38%), window insulators can be a primary source of carbon emission reductions!

Reduce before you produce is very applicable here. Insulating windows is over three times more cost effective than generating renewable energy. Reduce your demand as much as you can and "right size" your renewable energy. In'Flector Radiant Barrier Window Insulators are a product for the times.

Dennis Roberts's picture

Thank Dennis for the Post!

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Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on January 14, 2019

Once solar gains have passed through a window and hit an internal blind, they are already inside the space. Only if the blind surface is highly reflective and the solar rays redirected straight back out the window will this not result in some heat build-up. Thus, whilst the blinds may effectively block glare and daylight, conduction, convection and radiation will usually convey a large portion of the heat to the internal space.

 

This aspect of the technology remind me of recent pushes to not only reduce the use of fossil fuels but to also reduce the extraction of fossil fuels-- the 'keep it in the ground' strategy. Same goes with the solar irraditation-- you can tackle it by improving the process of cooling a building after it enters, butwhy not tackle it at the source and 'keep it outside.'

Interesting article-- thanks for sharing!

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