Question

How can the peak demand surge resulting from EV charging infrastructure be addressed in the near future?

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December 18, 2017

Please see my paper posted on Energy Central a few weeks ago:

http://www.energycentral.com/c/iu/imminent-unexpected-electric-loads?utm_medium=update_email&utm_campaign=weekly&utm_content=200777&utm_source=2017_12_13

Also, our company (Microgrid Labs, Inc., https://microgridlabs.com/) and our partners are working on comprehensive solutions for this problem. Contact our COO, Narayanan Sankar for details.

John Benson

Microgrid Labs

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December 18, 2017

Utilize other stored, solar energy sources such a natural gas and petroleum rather than less efficienct electricity and resource depleting batteries.

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January 4, 2018

The short answer is that this is not a significant problem. The US electric utilities are addressing residential charging, which is where 90 percent of EV charging takes place. By and large the utilities have plenty of distribution and generation capacity for increased residential charging (for a long time to come) via smart charging (time-of-use rates, demand response programs, vehicle grid integration (VGI), etc.). Corridor DC charging infrastructure is a more interesting issue. But there again, this will be an electric utility collaboration with charging infrastructure network providers such as EA and eVgo.

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January 4, 2018

I agree with Charles.  There is no peak demand surge from EVs in our territory.  Most charging is done at home and most of our EV drivers are on TOU rates which successfully drive charging to non-peak hours.  For circuit specific issues at public fast charge stations we are installing batteries.

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January 4, 2018

I agree with Charles.  There is no peak demand surge from EVs in our territory.  Most charging is done at home and most of our EV drivers are on TOU rates which successfully drive charging to non-peak hours.  For circuit specific issues at public fast charge stations we are installing batteries.

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